Homoeopathy For Farm And Garden

This board is for sharing results, experiences, concerns and thoughts on preparations - biodynamic or not - for use on plants and soils. These do not include 'peppers'.
Mark
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Homoeopathy For Farm And Garden

Post by Mark »

The book 'Homoeopathy For Farm And Garden' by one of the members of this forum - Vaikunthanath Das Kaviraj - is now available, from all good bookshops as they say or from the publisher at http://www.moodie.biz at UK£15

If it raises any questions in you why not ask on this forum and we can hear from the author himself.

Thanks Kaviraj

isadore
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Companion Plants?

Post by isadore »

Hello everyone -- I recently got a copy of the book which I read with great interest. The prevention of slugs alone would make the whole approach worthwhile, though I see it goes far deeper than that. I'm a practising student of Homeopathy in the Irish School, Dublin.

I have a question arising from the study of the book:

Vaikunthanath outlines that the constitutional remedy of a plant is its companion plant in potency. If its as simple as that (and perhaps I've misunderstood) Has there been any development of a table of correspondences for plants and their companion remedies? Perhaps i've missed something but that would strike me as being unusually useful.

I already have friends asking me for the "constitutional" remedy of carrots, cabbage, onions, kale and (inevitably!) cannabis ;)

I'm sure I'll have more questions as I study the book further. Looking forward to the discussion.

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Re: Companion Plants?

Post by Mark »

isadore wrote:Hello everyone ... I have a question arising from the study of the book:

Vaikunthanath outlines that the constitutional remedy of a plant is its companion plant in potency. If its as simple as that (and perhaps I've misunderstood) Has there been any development of a table of correspondences for plants and their companion remedies?


I think it is supposed to be as simple as that - but I'm also sure that this is conjecture to be proven rather than a dogma to be followed. The book mentions basil and tomatoes - companions from nursery to salad dish, but I can't think of many other plants which are so companionable. Will chips sort out all fish diseases?

Incidentally wikipedia reckons companion planting goes back to Leviticus.

There are lists of companion plants around; the most famous book is by Philbrick and Gregg. GHorganics have an online version. GW Agriculture have a chart of them. Enzo Nastati does one, (Le Consociazioni vegetali su base zodiacale - Associations of plants with the zodiac) based upon zodiacal associations. I think Michael Littlewood did a poster of them if memory serves
isadore wrote:I already have friends asking me for the "constitutional" remedy of carrots, cabbage, onions, kale and (inevitably!) cannabis ;)
I'm sure that the companion to cannabis is chocolate cake but only around midnight.

Mark
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Re: Companion Plants?

Post by Mark »

Mark wrote:Incidentally wikipedia reckons companion planting goes back to Leviticus.
I've followed that up a bit more and there is a companion planting table started on wikipedia. Cannabis is mentioned as an aid to cabbage plants but it doesn't say which plants might assist cannabis.

There is also a series of references to publications on that wiki page.

isadore
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Companion Plants

Post by isadore »

Thanks for the table, I can refer my gardening friends to it...

As far as cannabis goes, there's a reference here:
http://cannabisculture.com/articles/2159.html
Companion planting

Much research is still needed on the interrelationships of plants in the garden. Little is known about common vegetable garden plants effect on each other, let alone how they may react with cannabis.

Growing certain plants in proximity to each other has been documented to cause noticeable effects on growth, both positive and negative. The main companion plant that has attracted interest with underground marijuana researchers is stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) which has been said to increase essential oils in many plants.6
It in turn references

"Companion Plants and How to Use Them" by Helen Philbrick and Richard B Gregg.

The stinging nettle looks like a good candidate. Although Urtica dioica is mentioned, it's little sibling, Urtica Urens is a remedy well-used in the homeopathic materia medica. I'll suggest that in 6x and see how they get on with it.

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